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Branch Day Timings
Keelkattalai
- Beginers
Sat & Sun 3:30 - 4:30 pm
Keelkattalai
- Seniors
Sat & Sun 4:30 - 5:30 pm
Nanganallur
- Beginers
Mon & Fri 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Nanganallur
– Seniors
Wed & Fri 5:30 - 7:30 pm


Carnatic Vocal :

Carnatic music is considered as one of the oldest systems of music in the world. Carnatic music is a very complex system of music that requires much thought, both artistically and technically. The basis of Carnatic music is the system of ragas (melodic scales) and talas (rhythmic cycles). There are seven rhythmic cycles and 72 fundamental ragas.

All other ragas are considered to have originated from these. An elaborate pattern exists for identifying these scales, known as the 72 Melakarta Raagas. Tyagaraja, Muthuswami Dikshitar and Shyama Shastri, the three saint composers of the 19th century, have composed thousands of krithis that remain fresh among musicians and rasikas. The most important specialty of Carnatic music is its devotional element. The concept of the compositions are set entirely with a devotional outline. The notes of Carnatic music is "sa-ri-gaa-ma-pa-da-ni". These are abbreviations of the real names of swaras which are Shadjam, Rishabham, Gandharam, Madhyamam, Panchamam, Dhaivatam and Nishaadam.

Each note of the pattern (the swaraa) will have up to three varieties. The only exceptions for this are the two base notes shadjam and panchamam, sa & pa which have only one form, and madhyamam, the middle swara, which has only two notes. Spirituality has always been the prominent content of Carnatic music. The beautiful blending of the beauty and devotional element has made it extraordinary and divine.

The basic idea behind indian music compositions has been to see and seek the ultimate brahman or God. In fact, it has been told in Hindu scriptures that the easiest and best way to attain salvation is to sing the greatness of the Divine power. In Hindu scriptures, music and God have always been depicted together. Many deities have their own musical instruments and are all portrayed as lovers of music. Lord Siva or rudra is the embodiment of Nada (cosmic music) which is the first form of music. In Trinity Academy of Dance and Musicc (TADC) carnatic music is taught by professionals and performing artists very religiously. Here the students are expected to be punctual and regular to learn music in a professional way. Along with music, bajans, slogas and bhagavat gita are also taught for both children and adults as a relaxation tool for stress.


The teachers will decide (if very young) whether students are ready for the class. Students must bring their own music book for every class without fail. Students have to express an interest in learning. They also must show a desire to improve their skills and practice what they learn at least three or four times a week. Students must be committed to a regular attendance and should notify the teachers/coordinator in advance if they are unable to attend the class on a particular day.



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